Monthly Archives: January 2018

The Hidden Benefits of Tomatoes

Question:
Why do you eat tomatoes?

Answer:
Because it makes my soup look mild and taste great.

That is the reply most women we ask the above question gave until we let them see more valid reasons why they should eat tomatoes. They have been eating tomatoes simply because they were brought up to do so.

Are you among them?
If you answer either ‘Yes’ or ‘No’ continue reading and you will see valid reasons why we should eat tomatoes.

Here are 7 good reasons that make tomatoes worth eating

1. Tomatoes help prevent cancer
Although not all types of cancer but cancer such as breast, colorectal, prostate and stomach cancer. This is because of lutein, zeaxanthin and the high level of lycopene which is a natural antioxidant that have the ability to fight cancer causing cells.

2. Tomatoes are good for your heart
Tomatoes lowers blood pressure and also reduces cholesterol level because of its Vitamin B and potassium. It also prevent life threatening heart problems such as high blood pressure, heart attack and stroke.

3. Improve your vision
Macular degeneration can be prevented using lutein, lycopene and zeaxanthin. The only carotenoids found in the rectina and lens of the eyes are lutein and zeaxanthin, these two carotenoids apart from filtering light also remove rays that can damage eye tissue and eye related diseases. No cause for alarm, lutein, lycopene and zeaxanthin are found in tomatoes

4. Fight inflammation
Quercetin and kaempferol are two major flavonoids in tomato skin, that have the ability to counter inflammation.

5. Makes hair healthier
The appearance and texture of your hair can be improved by drinking tomato juice. Tomato juice revitalize hair growth and strengthen tufts of hair.

6. Increases capacity to burn fat
Carnitine is an amino acid that has the ability to increase the capacity for the body to burn fat by about 30%. Tomatoes with all stimulate the production of carnitine.

7. Fights constipation
When you eat foods that are high in fibre and water content you will have regular bowel movement and you will be well hydrated this fighting constipation. Tomatoes are high in fibre and water content.

Nutritional composition of tomatoes
Calories 18
Water 95%
Protein 0.9 g
Fiber 1.2 g
Fat 0.2 g
Saturated 0.03 g
Carbs 3.9 g
Sugar 2.6 g
Monounsaturated 0.03 g
Polyunsaturated 0.08 g
Omega-3 0 g
Omega-6 0.08 g

The Whole Truth About Super Foods

The lettuce or the peaches are not the same as before. It is a topic of conversation on many tables and a reality that has driven a new generation of dietetics: that of the so-called super foods.

Given the decrease in the quality of the products we consume today and, sometimes, in the face of an unbalanced diet, the arrival of those new products with extra properties is more than welcome: they are high in antioxidants (such as vitamins A, C and E) ) and phytonutrients (chemical substances present in plants that provide color and flavor, as well as protection against ultraviolet radiation and infections), eliminate toxins, contribute to reduce the risk of heart disease or cancer and combat aging.

It is common to hear about the excellence of traditional products in the Mediterranean diet, such as olive oil.

Myth or Reality

Are we faced with medicines capable of curing and shielding against possible ailments or is this a temporary and baseless tendency, a product of the popular interest of the developed world for diet and health?

A simple search in Google on the term “super food” reveals that every 0.13 seconds someone tracks the term on the Internet.

In addition, it returns around 700,000 results.

However, despite its omnipresence, there is not even an official definition.

Is it a trend or fashion; It is not something new. Years ago the scientific community named functional ingredients to nutrients that, without adding calories, preserve health, such as olive oil, nuts or blue fish. Hence comes the name super food, but this does not enjoy the scientific evidence. It is true that they are very healthy products.

The nutritionist of the Biomedical Research Center of the Carlos III Institute, Manuel Monino, agrees with the statement: “There is no superfood as such. Instead, rather than specific products, talk about food super-patterns: there is insufficient evidence of their claimed properties, in fact, most studies have conducted in vitro tests on animals and use very high doses of substances, impossible to achieve with the habitual intake of the food that contains them.

Even so, it is true that some are rich in bioactive substances or in phytochemicals that are in the focus of research, such as flavonoids, carotenes, phenolic compounds… “.

“They are healthy products, but they do not cure, they only preserve health at best”. Warns Irene Breton.

For this expert, the best way to provide the body with everything you need is through a varied diet rich in legumes, fruits, vegetables, nuts and whole grains, but without exclusive consumption of a specific product or excluding others, such as eggs or dairy “What contributes to health or takes away the food patterns and not eating something isolated. Some cater to do great business, that ask it to those who marketed the oat bran, exotic juices or Goji berries, the latter considered by many a super food when they are not different from our raisins, “.

In Spain, we spend more than 2,000 million euros on miracle products, which sometimes includes extracts from supposedly prodigious foods. According to Nieves Palacios, specialist in Endocrinology and Sports Medicine, when making a menu we can not forget fruits, nuts and vegetables every day and vegetables and fish two or three times a week.

In 2013 The New England Journal of Medicine published the results of a study of the Carlos III Institute of Madrid in patients with cardiovascular risk that proved that a diet rich in such foods and low in soft drinks, fatty meats and sweets reduced up to 30% the probability of heart attacks. “The concept” super “has become popular in the media, not among scientists,” he adds.

Exotic and traditional

What does seem clear is that incorporating these foods into a balanced diet is beneficial both physically and emotionally. “It produces emotional well-being and increases self-esteem, by being aware that we are taking care of our body,” says Itxasne Tome, a psychologist at the Ravenna Clinic.

But what to buy?

The acclaimed of all the life or those of extravagant name exalted by journalists and bloggers? Paula Rosso, nutritionist at the Lajo Plaza medical center, do not bet on both options.

“Some traditions return when they discover their active ingredients scientifically: for example Omega-3 acids and chia fiber, protectors of the cardiovascular system, or Goji berries, excellent antioxidant, although it has been discovered that some commercial presentations incorporated high doses of heavy metals, hence they sell less.

In any case, Mediterranean foods are also a source of vitamins and the basis of our diet, “adds the nutritionist. And as important as what to take is the way to do it.

“This type of food must be consumed raw or with the least possible cooking and take it very fresh so that it keeps its properties intact and makes it easier for the body to absorb it,” says Dr. Rosso. And nothing to gorge on one and marginalise all others.

“There is evidence that fruits and vegetables fight cancer, but in the form of supplements – that is, isolating their nutrients outside – they do not produce the same effects. Including large doses of a new food can sometimes mean displacing others of greater nutritional value and thus contribute to the imbalance, “says Manuel Monino.

Add Some Lemon Zest To Your Life

The origin of lemons is unknown but it’s pretty much agreed they were first grown in Assam (a region in northeast India), northern Burma or China. Somewhere along the line it became a hybrid between the bitter orange (sour orange) and citron, which is your basic granddaddy of the citrus family, with its thick bumpy rind and bitter taste.

The fruit has come a long way since then, making it one of the world’s favorite citrus. Arab traders brought lemons to the Middle East and Africa sometime later as it made its way to southern Italy around 200 B.C. and was cultivated in Egypt. Citron paved the way for all citrus as it arrived in the Mediterranean around the late first century BC. These days, the citron, which contains very little pulp or juice, is usually candied and baked into fruitcakes.

Slow to catch on, for more than a millennium citron and lemon were the only citrus fruits known in the Mediterranean basin. Lemons, though abundant and commonplace now, were actually rare in ancient Rome, prized by the elite, and represented high social status. (So if someone called you a lemon back then, it was probably a compliment.)

At first, lemons were not widely grown for food or seasoning but largely an ornamental plant, like tomatoes, until about the 10th century. The Arabs introduced the lemon into Spain in the 11th century, and by then they had become a common crop in the Mediterranean region. The lemon was introduced to Western Europe somewhere between the years 1000 and 1200 BC. and traveled with the Crusades throughout their journeys, making its way to England in the early 16th century. The name “lemon” first appeared around 1350-1400, from the old French word limon, and was Anglicized in England. The original Italian word limone dates back to the Arabic and Persian word limun. (More than you wanted to know.)

Thanks to Christopher Columbus, who brought them to Hispaniola (the Dominican Republic) in 1493, these new trees which produced strange yellow tart fruit, spread throughout the New World but were still used mainly as an ornamental and medicinal plant due to their very sour taste. (Apparently no one had figured out how to make lemon meringue pie yet).

While foodie president Thomas Jefferson boasted over one thousand fruit trees in his orchards, there is no record that he ever experimented with citrus, even though he must have encountered them in his travels to France, but the Virginia climate simply did not lend itself to citrus. However, lemons were being grown in California by the mid-1700s, and in tropical Florida by the 1800s, when they became a hit in cooking and flavoring.

Although lemon flavored puddings and custards have been enjoyed for centuries, our favorite lemon meringue pie as we know it today is a 19th-century product. The earliest recorded recipe was attributed to a Swiss baker named Alexander Frehse. There is also speculation that a British botanist may have concocted it around 1875, but whoever dreamed it up sure did us all a favor. One of America’s favorite pies, it still wows us to this day, with its tart custard base and light fluffy meringue topping.

Over 200 or so varieties of the lemon have evolved over the past three centuries. The Meyer lemon is named after Frank N. Meyer, who first introduced it to the USA in 1908, after he found it growing in Peking, China and brought back to the U.S. A favorite of pastry chefs for tarts and sorbets, it’s actually a cross between a lemon and an orange, with much of the U.S. crop grown in California’s Central Valley, and some in Florida and Texas. Unlike regular lemons, Meyer lemons are not picked green and cured after harvesting but are picked when fully ripe. They bear fruit year-round, are generally less sour and their pulp is orange-colored.

Many of us learned in grammar school that lemons and limes prevented a disease called scurvy, which Scottish surgeon James Lind discovered in 1747, urging the British Royal Navy to implement in order to save countless sailors. (Hence the nickname “limey” for a Brit, which sounded better than “lemony”). This opened the door to the value of Vitamin C and its importance in nutrition.

It’s hard to imagine life without the lemon. However you enjoy them, their bright yellow color, tangy taste and fragrant odor enhance our lives in many different ways, and if you are fortunate enough to live in an area where they grow, you can indulge for practically pennies. So, as the old saying goes, “When life hands you a lemon… “